Rocky Linux 83 Release Candidate Is Now Ready for Public

Rocky Linux 8.3 Release Candidate Is Now Ready for Public Testing – 9to5Linux

The Rocky Enterprise Software Foundation announced the general availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) version of their upcoming Rocky Linux 8.3 open-source enterprise-ready operating system.

If you’ve been waiting for a CentOS Linux 8 replacement, the wait is almost over, as Rocky Linux now has a Release Candidate you can download and try on your machines to see what the fuss is all about for this free, community-supported and open-source Red Hat Enterprise Linux alternative.

After AlmaLinux, now Rocky Linux steps up to conquer your server, promising a strong Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.x base, 100% compatibility with CentOS Linux, as well as with numerous new features and improvements. In fact, Rocky Linux is created by the founder of the CentOS project, Gregory Kurtzer.

“Rocky Linux is a community enterprise operating system designed to be 100% bug-for-bug compatible with America’s top enterprise Linux distribution now that its downstream partner has shifted direction,” said Gregory Kurtzer.

With the upcoming end of life of the CentOS Linux 8 operating system series on December 31, 2021, Rocky Linux promises to be a worthy replacement, always based on the most recent version of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) operating system.

For now, if you’re curious about Rocky Linux, you can download and test the Rocky Linux 8.3 Release Candidate (RC1) from the official website. Rocky Linux is available for x86_64 (64-bit) and AArch64 (ARM64) architectures in various flavors, including Minimal, Boot, and Full, and uses the same Anaconda installer as CentOS Linux or Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

However, please keep in mind that this is still a pre-release version, so don’t install it on a production machine. If you want to run Rocky Linux on your production server, you’ll have to wait a little bit more for its first stable release to hit the streets.

Last updated 2 days ago

This article was originally posted on 9to5linux.com. Read here

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