AlmaLinux OS 8.4 Is Out with Full Secure Boot Support, OpenSCAP Support, and More – 9to5Linux

The AlmaLinux project released today the AlmaLinux OS 8.4 distribution as a production-ready, drop-in replacement for the CentOS Linux 8 operating system series.

Derived from the freely available sources of the recently released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.4 operating system, AlmaLinux OS 8.4 is here to inherit all of its new features and improvements, such as support for the Intel “Tiger Lake” GPU family like Intel UHD and Intel Xe graphics, two new system roles, as well as improved edge computing capabilities.

On top of that, the AlmaLinux OS 8.4 release is here to introduce full support for the Secure Boot security standard, which means that you can now safely install the distribution on a computer with Secure Boot enabled.

Furthermore, this release introduces support for OpenSCAP security profiles, which the AlmaLinux project said they’re now ready for production, as well as a so-called “devel” repository that contains extra packages intended only for developers and not recommended to be used in a production environment.

New module streams are also present in the new AlmaLinux OS release, including Python 3.9, SWIG 4.0, Subversion 1.14, Redis 6, PostgreSQL 13, and MariaDB 10.5, and various compiler toolsets were updated to new versions, including GCC 10, LLVM 11.0.0, Rust 1.49.0, and Go 1.15.7.

Other than that, this release of AlmaLinux OS comes with the “PowerTools” repository disabled by default in an attempt to match the upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux distribution. The repository has been moved to a separate file called almalinux-powertools.repo for those who want/need to use it.

You can download AlmaLinux OS 8.4 right now from the official website, where you’ll find plenty of mirrors from all over the world. This release can be safely used in a production environment as a Linux server for any type of application. For more details, you can check out the release announcement page.

Last updated 3 days ago

This article was originally posted on 9to5linux.com. Read here

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